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B:T:L Matt
May 23rd, 2006, 11:16 AM
Does anyone know the actual dimensions in terms of length and width from the highest point top to bottom and the furthest end side to side? I work on a few customs on my lunch hour day to day and I want to make sure they're not too big or small. If anyone could chime in on that, it'd be greatly appreciated...

K/H_Addict
May 23rd, 2006, 12:36 PM
uhh...i could later today, but not that that would matter, becuase i'm sure netherspirit is posting dimensions to the millimeter as i type this :lol: :lol:

netherspirit
May 23rd, 2006, 12:37 PM
uhh...i could later today, but not that that would matter, becuase i'm sure netherspirit is posting dimensions to the millimeter as i type this :lol: :lol:

lol. Not really, I am at work. I am going home for lunch in about an hour, perhaps I will measure my cards if someone hasn't posted them by then.

oogiezone
May 23rd, 2006, 01:08 PM
I came up with 4.55inX4.8 in. I'm sure nether will double check these numbers for you when he gets home.

K/H_Addict
May 23rd, 2006, 01:29 PM
you know we love you nether, right? usually you are the quickest to respond to questions such as these.


the cards arent the same lengthwise by width wise?

netherspirit
May 23rd, 2006, 01:34 PM
4 and 7/8th wide by 4 and 5/8 tall

K/H_Addict
May 23rd, 2006, 02:09 PM
see? i told you he was quick about it.



i wonder why they are not the same lengthXwidth...it boggles my brain :shock:

TheRealQ
May 23rd, 2006, 02:34 PM
They are not the same height and width because the format is hexagonal. Each of the edge faces will be the same distance to the center but they have a 60 degree phase to each other rather than 90. The ratio of height to width of an equilateral hexagon will always be half the square root of three to one; or 1.414/2:1 ; simplified to .707:1. Basic math.

RichardD
May 23rd, 2006, 02:39 PM
It's to do with the fact that the shape is made up from hexagons. If a hexagon is made from six equal-length sides, and six 120 degree angles, then it's height and width won't be the same. Because you're not measuring two identical things. Apples and oranges, you see?

Anyway, what's this imperial measurement nonsense? The French have given us chuff-all of any real use, except the metric system. Which is superior to those silly imperial units in every way (except when it comes to miles and pints, obviously. If you're going to drink warm beer, it simply HAS to be served in pints)

K/H_Addict
May 23rd, 2006, 02:42 PM
w/e. i am done with learning new math forever. i have passed my geometry SOL and need not take my final exam, and don't need to take math next year, so i am all set.

TheRealQ
May 23rd, 2006, 03:07 PM
w/e. i am done with learning new math forever. i have passed my geometry SOL and need not take my final exam, and don't need to take math next year, so i am all set.

LOL, didn't mean to sound like lecture. Just trying to answer the question. BTW unlike most of your subjects math is going to be useful your entire life...unless you're poor and homeless and don't care what the volume of your cardboard box is. :P

RichardD
May 23rd, 2006, 07:16 PM
Hmm. The maths I learned up to the age of 11 has been useful; even the odd bit of simple algebra I'd leaned by then. But being able to calculate the area under a curve? Or knowing how to integrate an equation with imaginary numbers and Sin functions? Nope, never. In fact, of all the subjects I studied until the age of 18, the only one that has been of any real benefit in adult life was Engineering Drawing - and that was taken so seriously at school that we only studied for it one hour a week during our lunch breaks!

Being able to speak a foreign language, fluently - now THAT would have been useful. But I took latin, and the last native latin speaker's been dead for centuries.

TheRealQ
May 23rd, 2006, 07:29 PM
Okay maybe I'm the only one that continues to use math. I use it regularly in restoring the older home I bought, landscaping, shopping for the best deals, etc. Admittedly some of the advanced mathematics are only of continued use to engineers and scientists but even they have a foundation in logic and function which sets a precedent in thought as to a way to reason a situation that has nothing to do with math.

sigmazero13
May 24th, 2006, 12:56 AM
I use math quite a bit too. I'm a computer guy, and without having a strong foundation in math, it's very difficult to really program the way you need to.

Heck, I took a class called Linear Algebra my freshman year in college, and the whole time I thought "what the heck would I ever use this for?". Then my Junior year, I took a Computer Graphics class, and let me just say that without Linear Algebra, that class would have REALLY been difficult :)

I guess it just depends on what field you go into. I think everyone should have a basic understanding of algebra, but things beyond that may not be important unless you are in a math-oriented field of study, like computer programming.

jcb231
May 24th, 2006, 03:59 AM
I was an arts major in college.

That should probably be "nuff said" about my use of math.

I was very good at math in high school (perfect 800 on my math SAT and so on) but during my senior year I stopped and thought "why am I doing this if I hate it so much?" and dropped out of AP Calculus to take a simple probability and statistics class that was much easier and much more useful. For the two small math courses I had to take in college, I took logic and history.....sooooo easy they weren't even 100 level courses.

Besides basic addition/subtraction, and the stuff everyone uses like that, the math I use the most now is probability (often for games, but also for gambling, card-counting, combination locks, etc), with a little geometry here and there, mostly for plan reading. Rarely do I use anything else of any worthwhile complexity. Algebra, Trig, Calculus? Nope....a boy of about 13 or so showed me his basic-level math worksheets recently and I couldn't do any of his homework. Any of it. At all. It's amazing what you forget when you don't need to use it.

Agent Minivann
May 24th, 2006, 07:13 AM
Funny story about math for me, I had a hard time with algebra in high school. It was a "What's the point?" kind of thing. I took college algebra and I was like "I get it now". It's sad that in high school there was virtually zero examples of how the stuff is actually useful, yet in the college textbooks it seemed like an advertisement of how to use algebra in real life situations. Then I got into calculus and I decided that calculus is the most useful math in the world.

B:T:L Matt
May 24th, 2006, 08:55 AM
Thanks for the measurements guys. I'll be putting some of these customs up for your valued opinions. Yeah as far as the whole Math thing goes, I was never one to care for it or school for that matter, I just did because I knew it was important. The irony of me not caring for math all that much is that I use it in both my professions. I'm a Geotech Draftsman, which lives and breathes Math, but also, being in a Metal band, we need to know math for notes, time signatures, scales, and beats per measure.

sigmazero13
May 24th, 2006, 11:44 AM
Agent Minivann - I would agree about Calculus; most engineering, and certainly almost ALL physics, would be impossible without Calculus to some degree or another :)

Doesn't mean everyone needs to know it to survive, but as far as math goes, it's probably the most "useful" (partly because I would go so far to say that Algebra, Geometry, and Trig are in some ways simply "extensions" of Calculus).

InfinityMax
May 24th, 2006, 01:10 PM
I wholeheartedly agree that seriously advanced math will only be useful to seriously advanced mathematicians. However, advanced math does allow you to exercise logic and problem-solving. It's like weight-lifting for your brain. I try to do a little tough math every now and then just to keep the ol' cranium in shape.

On the other hand, being fluent in Spanish, French, Italian, Chinese and Japanese would be freaking awesome, and a lot more useful than calculating pressure differentials. Nuclear physics is BORING.

jcb231
May 25th, 2006, 12:52 AM
I was killer at Latin in school. I just wish I had a time machine so I could use that skill.

Although I'm sure Caesar would have me executed for having what must be the freakiest accent ever. I mean, kids from one side of NY to the other have different accents....what must thousands of years and an ocean apart do to a language?

CornPuff
May 25th, 2006, 01:34 AM
This the math thread(jack)? cool!
Math rocks your world whether you know it or not. IMHO most pople should know probability, combinatorics and statistics, moreso than calculus. For you non-mathy types, you can think of it as advanced counting and risk analysis.

If everyone had a bit more experience with basic math, the world would be a better place. Numerology and horoscopes would be dead, the lottery would be out of business, and nobody would play roulette or slots. Best of all, people would understand risk better, so people would be less afraid of dying to serial killers, avian flu or terrorists than dying on their drive to work.

That said, I also give props to Calculus, a proud sponsor of Heroscapers.com, the internet and electricity.

As it is, knowledge of math lets me win at heroscape :twisted:

TheRealQ
May 25th, 2006, 05:54 AM
On the other hand, being fluent in Spanish, French, Italian, Chinese and Japanese would be freaking awesome...

I can cuss in all those languages, does that count?


As it is, knowledge of math lets me win at heroscape

That is supposed to be a geek secret! :shock: Hopefully the non-geeks won't read this thread and discover the secret of our power. :pray:

CornPuff
May 25th, 2006, 06:16 AM
:o Holy crap! TheRealQ is right ! :o
Unless you know the ASCII code for 'bell' and can explain neutrino oscillations, please disregard my last post!

Agent Minivann
May 25th, 2006, 06:49 AM
Agent Minivann - I would agree about Calculus; most engineering, and certainly almost ALL physics, would be impossible without Calculus to some degree or another :)

Doesn't mean everyone needs to know it to survive, but as far as math goes, it's probably the most "useful" (partly because I would go so far to say that Algebra, Geometry, and Trig are in some ways simply "extensions" of Calculus).

Funny thing is, I majored in exercise science. When I got bored in a class, I used Calculus and basic Physics to estimate how much I would have to lift in an olympic weight lifting lift to generate the same force it would take to jump high enough to dunk a basketball. I don't know about the rest of you guys, but I call that real useful!

Agent Minivann
May 25th, 2006, 06:57 AM
This the math thread(jack)? cool!
Math rocks your world whether you know it or not. IMHO most pople should know probability, combinatorics and statistics, moreso than calculus. For you non-mathy types, you can think of it as advanced counting and risk analysis.


Combinatorics is a new one to me, what is it?

Ah, there are lies, damned lies, and statistics. I think that statistics should be taught to everyone in the sense that they need to know what the different types of statistical analyses are. It always bugs me when companies (granted usually infomercial types) make claims based on crappy statistics, and people fall for it big time. Beyond that I think statistics is another one in the category of "a few narrow fields use this intensively".

CornPuff
May 25th, 2006, 07:16 AM
Combinatorics? Its all about counting things while satisfying constraints.

52 factorial = the number of different orderings of a deck of playing cards
Or you can count how many different 5 card hands you could be dealt from that deck. 2598960

Or you can count the number of Perfect Riffle Shuffles it takes before all cards return to their original positions on a deck of N cards. (I dont remember).

A perfect riffle shuffle is when you cut the deck in 2 equal halves, then interleave the cards perfectly (one from the left, then one from the right...). It was part of a hellish project my math teacher gave me :)

You could also count how many different ways there are to count to 100 using distinct positive integers without regard to order. 190569292

Or you can count the number of ways Deathwalker 9000 can roll all blanks for defense. 1

I think i went a little overboard, but thats just a little taste of Combinatorics...