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Old June 6th, 2010, 09:27 PM
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Izner Izner is offline
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Exclamation Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial [COMPLETE!]

Welcome to... Cooking With IZNER!!!


No. Wait.

HOW TO RESIN CAST HEROSCAPE TILES

With, y'know, resin and stuff. Hmm. Yes.

*Ahem*

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- THIS IS THE STUFF YOU'RE GONNA NEED -

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SILICONE - I use Dragon Skin 20 (Formerly called Smooth-Sil 920), available at SmoothOn.com. It's a 2 part formula, 1:1 mix ratio, very durable, and captures an amazing amount of detail.
A two pound sample size (picture above) goes for $28.67.
How much does it make? Hard to say. Depends on how thick your mold is, how much excess you pour around the subject, etc. I made an array of one piece molds my first time around, and had enough to be producing about 11 tiles at a time. I still had more silicone and had wasted some while getting used to working with it.
The official instructions can be read here.

RESIN - I use Smooth-Cast 326, available at SmoothOn.com. Like the silicone it's a two part formula, 1:1 mix ratio. This resin is clear, and is therefore very receptive to different dyes and pigments.
In the past I've used 327, because it has the longest pot life. Longer pot life means more time to adjust the pigment, but 326 seems to work just fine, and since it sets quicker, you can make more tiles faster. 325 Sets waaay to quick, and undergoes a great deal more shrinkage. Shrinkage is the enemy of precision parts, such as these interlocking tiles. Srsly.
A two pound sample size (just like the silicone jars above) goes for $24.72.
How much does it make?

Quite a bit. All of this was made with one set of jars. If I'd been more frugal I probably could have had more. Bear in mind most of these are the thin water-tile types, and that land tiles take more resin, but not much.
The official instructions can be read here.



THE OTHER STUFF
1. Resin Dye -
You can basic dyes at most craft stores. SmoothOn.Com has a wide variety of dyes you won't find in most stores, such as metal finish, and glow in the dark. I used white and blue dyes from the SO-Strong dye series. For my lava tiles, I used the orange Ignite fluorescent color pigment.
For the most part, the dye you use has to be specifically made for resin. Substitutes need not apply. However, you can get creative and throw some glitter in the mix, or whatever else you can think of. I tried burning some newspaper and mixing the ashes in once. Worked, but looked horrid. C'est la vie. Because of how thin Heroscape tiles are, you're probably going to want solid dyes. But more on that in the tutorial later.

2. Mold Release -
Another product you can pick up in most craft stores. Very very important. Trust me, I learned the hard way.

3. Mixing Cups -
Something disposable to pour your resin in. (Resin does wash out, but its slimy and toxic) Get something as clear as possible, so you can see how much your pouring of each chemical, and to properly assess the colors you'll be adding.

4. Container for the Silicone Mold -
Some people build boxes outta acrylic with hot glue. I prefer a stop to the dollar store for some cheap Tupperware I don't feel bad about destroying. When selecting your container, consider the size of what you'll be casting. You don't want something that's gonna be too large - you'll only waste your precious silicone. Also make sure its something you'll be able to get the silicone out of once it solidifies. So take a good look at the shape. Most Tupperware is fine for this. Also, it's flexible nature helps too. I ended up using two different containers for the two halves of the mold. Oh yea, and a coffee mug is a really really dumb idea for a mold container. Just saying. Not that I did it. >_> *Ahem*

5. Spirit Level -
Good to give you a nice level pour.

6. Paper Towel
- Seriously, I cannot stress this enough. Strap a roll to your forehead or something. This is a messy job, and you'll need it for cleaning container rims, spills, stir sticks, etc. Have lots. DO WANT.

7. Stir-Sticks, Toothpicks, etc. -
I used hot-glue sticks, as I have them in abundance. Something to stir up your resin mixtures. The toothpicks are good for adding precision drops of dye. Sometimes a drop is too much.

8. Grocery Bags -
A great surface to work on, as resin can't seep through it. I use it under all my resin pours.

9. Cardboard -
Another good surface for working on. Keeps your roommates from cursing you after you accidentally dye the table blue. Good thing it was a cheap buy off craigslist. And in my defense, it was a nice blue!

10. Baking Sheet - Used for tempering the resin pieces after they've been cast.

11. Razor/Xacto-Blade - Quite essential for trimming your mold, and your finished resin pieces. Make sure it's sharp. CAUTION - It's sharp.

12. Misc. -
Your situation may call for other things, like clay to help hold down the tile (pictured), or something you might add to the resin mix, etc. Don't restrict yourself to what I include here.

13. Source Material -
Pick a piece(s) you can afford to loose. Just in case.

OTHER THINGS YOU NEED
Clothes You Don't Care About -
Resin's clear but it still wrecks clothes. It fuses the fabric together into hardened patches. Quite odd. And do I even need to explain the threat that dye poses? Really now.

Ventilation - This stuff is TOXIC, especially the resin. Get a fan, open the windows. Better yet, take that stuff outside.
Both the resin and silicone come with detailed sheets explaining the potential hazards of working with the materials. Give it a read. Don't let it scare you away from the project, but work smart.

Instructions - Both the silicone and the resin come with 'how-to' guides, that are more then enough to accomplish this project. This tutorial is gonna go over most of it, but you should read the papers anyways, ESPECIALLY if you're using something different then the brand I used.




-----------------------------------
- DESIGNING YOUR MOLD -
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CONSIDER YOUR SUBJECT

Your first step in designing a multi-part mold is considering where you want one part to end and another to begin. Obviously you want to make sure that however you design your mold, your original part and anything you make is capable of being removed from the mold. Heroscape tiles have 'V' shaped grooves that could prove problematic in a non-flexible mold, for example. (In our rubbery silicone mold, they're not.)


I decided the first half would encapsulate the entire outside form of the tile, and the second half would capture the details of the underside. This would essentially create a cup to pour the resin into, and a plug in the shape of the tile's underside to squeeze out the excess. It wastes a bit, but I've had great success with this design. Is there a better way? It's quite possible. I'm open to suggestions.

THE FIRST PIECE
We're gonna start by capturing an I'm impression of the tile exterior.

Selecting a Container- There are an array of choices at hand. One of the most intelligent, yet time consuming is to design a pour box out of acrylic. The nice thing about this is that the box is tailored to your shape, and won't waste precious silicone. It also makes very neat clean silicone blocks. This tutorial uses this method, and is worth a watch.
Another trick is to use some sort of molding clay to shape walls. Easy, and generally yields decent results, as long as your walls don't leak. Also, some clays like Sculpy have strange reactions with the silicone, causing the parts directly contacting the clay to not quite set. Something about the surfer content, I've been told. Ask Kurrok, he's the elementalist around here. (In my experience the firing step seems to alleviate this, but I've only done it with small molds)
The method that I went with (and will be referencing for the remainder of the tutorial) was to run to the local uber-cheapo store for some nice pliable flat-bottomed Tupperware. Score! Instant container. The most ideal of pour-containers? No, not really. The easiest, cheapest, and most readily available? Ya, pretty much. You may need two different sized containers, one slightly bigger then the other. If your Tupperware is tapered, instead of perfectly cylindrical, you're gonna get an conic shape that won't fit back in the container when you flip it over. It's an easy fix, and another container shouldn't break the bank.
You can also make multi-tile molds pretty easily. A larger container would allow for multiple pieces spread out. Just don't pack pieces to close to one another, you need the silicone walls between the pieces to remain sturdy.
And did you know the spellchecker keeps demanding I capitalize Tupperware? I didn't realize it was a registered name. Still, I don't like pushy computer code. So, take this spell check: tupperware tupperware tupperware tupperware tupperware. I'm such a rebel.
Woo, tangent.

Prepping the Part and Container - We need to set the tile face up into the container and prepare the whole shebang for sliconey goodness.
The fact of the matter is, these tiles float. So we're gonna have to come up with some method of holding the tile down. I used a big healthy glob of clay. It's heavy, and it sticks to the bottom of the container. On water tiles and slim parts, a dab of hot glue is a viable option. It holds alright, and peels off neatly. Make sure you avoid the little edge bits, you don't want clay or glue in there. It doesn't come out so well.

That's one tile I'll be replacing from Auggies. Again, make sure you're working with expendable tiles. Let's not be abusing our lava field tiles, yes?
When you stick the tile down, you really need to make sure there's no gaps where silicone can get underneath. Cuz if it can, it will. We can fix it if it does, don't rage quit just yet, but it's a nuisance best avoided. So plant the tile in the container and we're ready to move on.

Grab the mold release!

Don't be stingy with this stuff. Spray down everything that the silicone's gonna touch, let it dry, and do it again. I cannot stress how important this stuff is for making your mold and prolonging the life of you mold. Without it, you'll never get your parts out. Bit of a big deal, that.
The mold release should air dry completely by itself (I had a fan running overhead), but if it doesn't you can dab at any remaining damp areas. Patience is a virtue!

Pouring the Silicone - This is the part where you're gonna want to read the instructions that come with your silicone, and ready your mixture. Mine is a simple 1:1 mix ratio. Just add equal parts blue jar and yellow jar, stir and pour. As I mentioned above, I can't vouch for any chemicals other then the ones I used. There are some tricks for measuring how much silicone you're gonna need, like pouring rice into the container and measuring how much was used (As shown in this tutorial). I just kinda eyed it.


One of the key things here is avoiding bubbles. For obvious reasons, they're counterproductive. The two components need to be well blended, and with the sticky consistency it has, folding in bubbles is largely unavoidable. There are several tricks to work them out however.
The best of these is a vacuum chamber. However, these are expensive and not something most people have lying around. I've heard there are cheap manual pumps, and ways of making chambers out of Tupperware. I intend to look into this, and shall report back once I have. ***Looked into it, and tupperware is a no-go. It's just not strong enough to support a vacuum. More on this later.***Another trick is the tap method. After you're done stirring, rap the container repeatedly against the table or another hard surface. It's not gonna clear it up completely, but this will draw many of the bubbles to the surface. Once you're done with this, you're ready to pour!


The goal is to pour enough silicone into the container that it completely covers the tile. Plan for about a quarter inch of silicone over the tile. This should be enough to give you a reasonably sturdy mold without wasting silicone. As you get a feel for this, you can tailor this to your tastes and budget. Do not pour the silicone directly onto the tile. Instead pour it somewhere around the tile, so that it may flow onto tile, reducing your chances of air pockets. Pour slow and steady. Try and maintain control of your stream. It can be a little tricky, with its syrupy nature. The major focus here is to prevent pockets of air from forming around the teeth of the tile, as well as anywhere else. Nice smooth flowing pour.


Once you're done its a good idea to balance it out. If your workspace isn't quite level, I recommend grabbing a spirit level and something like my tape roll here to level it out. This will make the actual resin casting process a little easier.

Demolding
- The silicone takes a while to set... Different brands, grades and even temperature/humidity conditions will effect the set time. Also, make sure it's someplace where nothing will disturb it. Don't need the cat wrecking your work, amirite? The silicone I'm using (Dragon Skin 20 / Smooth-Sil920) sets in about 4 hours, but I prefer to give it the better part of a day. Once it's nice and firm, carefully remove your new mold from your pour container and behold!


If it didn't come out looking quite as nice as mine don't freak. Sometimes your tile isn't securely mounted to the container, and perhaps silicone seeped in underneath. Take your trusty hobby knife (heads up people - these things are sharp) and trim away the excess. The cleaner the impression the better.

I'll bet you're all psyched to rip that tile out and check out your awesome work. If you really must know, go for it. My advice? Wait a little longer. Unless you're really unsure if you got a decent casting, its best to leave the tile where it is. Improves the chances of the second pour going smoothly.

THE SECOND PIECE

Selecting a Container
It's time to pour the interior (positive) element of the mold!


If you're following the tupperware method, chances are you'll be needing a different container this time. Your silicone pour probably wont fit flipped upside down. I grabbed a larger bowl. You could just as easily trim the silicone mold to fit, but I liked my neat clean shape. I'm fussy. Also, thicker walls result in a stronger mold.

Forming A Key


Before we start in on pouring the second half, you will want to make a key- some way of determine the proper mold orientation. The easiest solution is to cut a generous notch in the side of your mold as seen above. This way, when you pour the opposing side, you have a notch to match the groove.

Pouring the Silicone
This is all a 'lather rise repeat' of the first piece.
-Spray the parts and container with the mold release. (Be through! The new silicone you will be pouring will naturally want to adhere to your previous silicone part, so make sure it's well coated in mold release.)
-Position your part within the container.
-Pour the silicone.
Follow the instructions I've laid out previously. Pour slowly to ensure detail capture. If you're feeling bold, you might want to start by pouring right in the center of the tile, and allowing the silicone to flow outward, ensuring the tile edges do not hold any bubbles.

Demolding and Trimming
When you're certain the silicone is set (give it time!) Gently remove your elements from the bowl and carefully separate them from one another. And Bam! You've got a mold! Except... ew. It's got all sortsa crud on it. I mean, look at that. Is it an ash tray?

Well worry not! A pair of standard scissors (wouldn't recommend an exacto for this job) will trim that excess off.

See that negative of the key you just made? Now your mold will only fit together one specific way. Spiffy specificity!
When trimming, you're gonna wanna cut off most of the overhanging silicone. Basically anything that makes it a bowl shape like that. But make sure you save that key! It's important if you want an accurate tile form.


This
is how mine came out, after a good shave.

Again, note how I retained the key. You want to trim enough to ensure the excess air/resin can escape as you press the two mold elements together, but keep enough of the flat surface so that the positive plug part can properly suspend within the negative bowl part. Here they are together. Together again, at last, for the first time for the last time. Romance!


Is it pretty? Naw, man. Does it work? You bet your sweet petunias it does!
That blue you're seeing is excess resin after pouring a tile. Because I trimmed the mold down, there is now room for that excess resin to run out of the mold.


Bake?
Some silicone rubbers (Including the Smooth-On products I suggested) recommend a brief heat tempering. Helps solidify the form, and prevents future shrinkage and what not. Now would be a good time to follow that recommendation. Read dem instructions and heat accordingly in your fancy-pants kitchen oven. OVENS ARE HOT. THE SILICONE WILL GET HOT. GET AN ADULT. HOT THINGS ARE HOT. Also dangerous.

Don't have an oven? Not the end of the world. Your mold may experience a shorter life-span, but it shouldn't be significant.




-----------------------------
- POURING YOUR TILES -
-----------------------------

So! We have the hard part out of the way. We have a mold! And now we want to use the mold! Novel idea, amirite? Lets get started!


PREPPING YOUR MOLDS
Just like when we poured our molds, you're gonna want that sweet sweet mold release. This is going to ensure that you're custom tiles remove neatly from the mold. Without mold release, your tiles will stick to the silicone. They may not come out at all. Or they may rip elements of the mold away with them. The release agent is going to ensure you're components have a long working life.

Thoroughly mist your mold. Make sure you get into the little cracks and corners. Especially the teeth of the Heroscape tile. Let it soak for half an hour, give or take, and wipe away the excess release agent. Too much mold release can ruin small details, but it's still important to have.

This coating will last you for several resin castings. You can still give it a light mist before use each time, but it's not really necessary. Coat it every few uses, especially if it goes though a long period of disuse.

Make sure you spray BOTH parts of your mold!

SETUP
Again, the chemicals we're about to use are TOXIC. Your best option is to work outdoors. Your second best is to work in a well ventilated area, away from children, pets, pregnant women, etc. READ YOUR SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS. Don't fear the materials, but work smart. Work in an optimal temperature as well. High heat or cold can effect the resin's ability to set. Consult your instructions for best working conditions.

Unless you're working on a scrap surface (I use a big scrap particle board), you'll want to cover the surface in something the resin can't soak though. A grocery bag, or spread-out trash bag will work nicely. I promise this will be messy, and if the resin cures on your work surface it will be very difficult to remove it. Keep lots of paper towels handy and prepare for unexpected messes.

Place your mold and make it as level as possible. If you have a spirit level, us it atop your mold (just the negative). If your mold pour was at all uneven this will compensate for it. No spirit level? You can just eye it. This step of evening your mold matters more for one part molds. But will help eliminate potential problems.

MEASURING RESIN
One of the reasons I recommend the Smooth-On resin is because it uses a very simple 1:1 ratio mixture. Pour out equal parts of both chemicals and it works great. Some resins require you to pour out the resin and then add a few drops of catalyst based on the weight. It needs to be precise, and makes working with small amounts of material downright frustrating.


The instructions included with your resin should walk you through this part very easily, but I'll include it here anyways. Start by gently tumbling the two bottles. DO NOT SHAKE! The idea is to gently mix the two solutions up without introducing bubbles. Rocking them back and forth for a minute or so should be sufficient.

Pour out both chemical A and chemical B into separate cups. Use disposable cups, these chemicals can ruin the cups, and make them unsafe for future use. Clear cups will help you ensure that you've poured equal parts of each. Make sure you keep track of which cup has what chemical in it!

The amount I've poured out in the picture above is more then enough for one standard land tile, using the mold I've created. It can be a little tricky figuring out how much resin you need, but if you're just making one tile at a time, it's not gonna be a lot. A little trial and error will set you straight.

When you're done pouring, ALWAYS wipe down the bottle, especially the threaded lip, and seal the containers again.

These chemicals are sensitive to air and moisture exposure. And in the steps that follow, it's easy to forget about your resin bottles, or worse, tip them over. Consider this: You need equal parts of both chemicals to make anything. You spill one container, you spill them both.

I cannot stress wiping down your bottles enough. If left on the threads, these chemicals will seal the bottle shut, and you will have a very difficult time re-opening them. Chemical B is usually okay, but even with my best cleaning efforts, I always have a hard time opening chemical A. You will probably need to invest in a lid opener. If and when you do, get one of the rubber grip style openers, not the kind with the gripper teeth. The plastic these containers is made out of is soft, and the teeth will just cut though it.

ADDING DYE
Now it's time to add some pigment.

If you're planing on making a completely clear piece, you can skip this step. Smooth-Cast resin is designed to set clear. If you're planning on painting your object and the color doesn't matter I would not recommend skipping this step. Add black or white, or another solid color to your dye first. Clear or colored-clear components tend to show though paint.

Set aside your cup of Chemical A (You kept track of which is which, right?). We will be adding the dye directly to Chemical B.
These dyes tend to run strong, so go light. The more you add, the more opaque the color becomes. Some dyes may require several drops to achieve the desired color, some may take as little as a bit on the end of a toothpick. It's going to take some experimentation and practice to get the right color, and keep it consistent. Take notes when you find something that works. Stir thoroughly to properly visualize your pigment.


Also keep in mind the color you get in the cup may change. Adding Chemical A in the next step will dilute the color slightly, and spreading the resin thin, like it will be with the Heroscape tiles will make it lighter as well. A rule of thumb is to make the color a little darker then you intend the final product to appear.

Be careful: You can add too much dye. Too much pigment has a strange reaction with resin, causing it to become very hot and set extremely quickly. As in: too quick to poor properly. Another side effect is soft resin. Diluting the resin with too much dye can cause the final product to be much more flexible, less solid.

If you're planning on adding anything else to your mixture, such as glitter, now is probably a good time to add it. This kinda thing is best left up to your own judgement. Experiment!

MIXING AND POURING
Consult your instructions regarding your resin's pot life. This is how much time you have to work with the resin before it begins to set. This will give you a good idea of how quickly you need to work.


Pour chemical A into the cup containing chemical B and the dye, and begin stirring. You need to stir VERY thoroughly. If your resin is not well mixed, it will not set correctly. Try and keep the bubbles out of the mix, but at this point, a through mix is more important. When your done, rap the container repeatedly against the table, to work out as much of the bubbles as you can.

Time to pour! Pour slowly, and neatly. When working with small details, give it time to flow into elements. Be careful not to trap pockets of air in the mold. Not really a big issue with our Heroscape mold, but it's good advice in general.


Fill the mold most of the way up, and grab the other half of your mold. Once again, the trick here is avoiding bubbles as you introduce the second half of your mold. I recommend lowering the plug slowly, giving the excess resin room to flow out. And once the plug is in, don't mess with it. Remember to line up your key! Let your freshly poured tile sit. Wait time varies based on resin from a few hours to the better part of a day. Give it a little extra time to cure. The tile will still be a little soft when you remove it, and the last thing you want to do is stretch or warp your part.

DEMOLDING
At last! Very gently ease your components apart. Take your time and make sure you do not damage your mold. If you used your mold release properly this should not be a tough battle. And...


Success! I hope. How did it come out?
If you've made it this far, congrats! It's time to add the finishing touches.

BAKE AND TRIM
These two steps can be done in any order.

At some point, you'll want to take your exacto (WARNING SHARP!) and trim the excess off your tile.

You will also want to temper your tiles in the oven (WARNING HOT!). Your resin instructions will specify the proper time and temperature. This helps 'set' the resin, and makes the tile a bit more rigid.

I recommend heat tempering first.
Your tile will be somewhat flexible and gummy after demolding. This may make it difficult to trim the excess, and more vulnerable to warping. Tempering will help relieve that.

VICTORY!
That's pretty much it! Now take those fancy custom tiles and get 'scapeing!



-------------------
- FOLLOW UP -
-------------------
So, What now?
Wait, you're still here? Oh, what else? Um...
Well there's a lot of things you can do from here.

This resin can be painted. Just make sure you wash the tiles before you do. Any mold release on the tiles will prevent the paint from sticking. A nice dry-brush of paint on the top your land tiles can simulate the look of standard scape tiles. When I made my swamp tiles I used a sponge to add a mossy texture on the underside of the tile.

You can add things to the resin mixture, like glitter. Some things may react negatively with the resin, but nothing ventured, nothing gained, I suppose. Avoid fluids, including non-resin dyes. They'll just make a mess.

There are lots of other parts to cast. Wound markers, water tiles, figures, rocks from the lawn, etc. Experiment and explore! Having some small mold elements on hand is nice, in the event that you make too much resin. It gives you something too use it up on. I can't count how many wound markers I've poured out of excess resin...

Heck, use your molds for other things. If your silicone is food grade (I believe the Dragon Skin is, but check first) pour some melted chocolate in it. ChocoScape! (Make a fresh mold. DO NOT use one that's already had resin poured in it.)

I made an ice cube tray.


There are many professional molds for sale on the internet as well. Hirst Arts sells some absolutely incredible molds, that can be used for an infinite number or purposes. The website is also a great resource for project ideas, and suggestions. I've bought several of their molds, and absolutely love them.

There are alternate materials out there. You can pour tiles out of different resins, or even plaster or dental lab stone. There are lots of different mold materials available, including hydrocolloid, putties, tube-caulk, etc.

SHARE YOUR SUCCESS AND FAILURE!
I would love to see and hear about what you've made. What you've done differently, what works, what doesn't.
Please continue to post in this thread!

DISCLAIMER: I am by no means an authority on this subject. Just a guy who has made enough mistakes to offer a bit of advice.

IS MY TUTORIAL NOT ROCKING YOUR WORLD?


-Check out Instructables.com. They've got tutorials on just about anything you can imagine, including mold making and resin casting. It's where I got my start.

-This youtube video is an excellent guide for getting started. A bit more precision then my work, I'd say.

-Talyn was the first one on the Heroscapers scene with resin cast terrain. Check out his thread, Resin Cast Terrain Tiles. He's got some great pictures that might provide the insight you're seeking.

-Read the instructions that come with the chemicals! There's a good chance they contain everything you need to know.

QUESTIONS? SUGGESTIONS? REQUESTS? MANGO?
Post a reply, send a PM, hire a hitman. Wait. Scratch that last one. Anyways I'm open to any of the above. Except assassination. Yea, no.
FEEDBACK IS APPRECIATED!


Last edited by Izner : January 19th, 2013 at 09:30 PM.



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Old June 6th, 2010, 11:22 PM
Bear1211 Bear1211 is offline
 
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Re: (INCOMPLETE) Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial

Thanks for the effort, gives me a wonderful idea where to start!


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Old June 7th, 2010, 12:21 AM
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Quack188 Quack188 is offline
 
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Re: (INCOMPLETE) Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial

Can't wait to see some pictures. Good luck killing zombies.


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Old June 7th, 2010, 01:57 AM
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Re: (INCOMPLETE) Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial

I'm looking forward to the next installment!


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Old June 7th, 2010, 02:36 AM
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Re: (INCOMPLETE) Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial

I bought a small kit of this, now ill actully be able to use it , btw I have l4d2.... everytime I close my eyes i see ellis being crushed to death by a karma charger. xD


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Old June 7th, 2010, 06:23 PM
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Hidicul Hidicul is offline
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Re: (INCOMPLETE) Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial

Sounds like someone may have cut themselves with thier SHARP razor/xacto knife..lol I've done it myself once while I was cutting apart figures. One of my kids came up and patted my shoulder...and slip followed immediatly by a oh @%*#. LOL. Anyways I can't wait for the next instalment. By the way about how many tiles are you getting out of those small packs?


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Old June 7th, 2010, 10:43 PM
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Re: (INCOMPLETE) Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial

Big thanks for starting the tutorial! Cant wait for it too be finished!


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Old June 8th, 2010, 06:19 PM
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Re: (INCOMPLETE) Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial

Looking forward, though I probably won't ever try it. The 'cooking' picture cracks me up. Also, have we traded XBox gamertags? I love L4D2.


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Old June 8th, 2010, 08:36 PM
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Re: (INCOMPLETE) Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial

This is going to be good!


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Old June 8th, 2010, 11:34 PM
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Re: (INCOMPLETE) Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial

Quote:
Originally Posted by g1shark View Post
I bought a small kit of this, now ill actully be able to use it , btw I have l4d2.... everytime I close my eyes i see ellis being crushed to death by a karma charger. xD
Chargers are... special. I've been instakilled by them more then once.
If you're playin' L4D or L4D2 on Steam, my ID is Lariat. (The one with the Dr. Horrible icon) Message me if u wanna play sometime. Be warned: I take lotsa damage and I hit my teammates a lot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hidicul View Post
Sounds like someone may have cut themselves with thier SHARP razor/xacto knife...

By the way about how many tiles are you getting out of those small packs?

I've done craft work and used cutting tools for most of my life, and learned proper etiquette... but accidents still happen. A slice here, a finger there... the casualties of art and hobby! But if I can keep others from hurting themselves that'd be super keen.

Also, I updated the tutorial to answer your question. Thank you for the question!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NecroBlade View Post
have we traded XBox gamertags? I love L4D2.
'Fraid I don't have an XBox. I'm one of those people who're hopeless with console FPS games. If you're on Steam tho, look me up sometime. My Steam ID is Lariat. (The one with the Dr. Horrible icon)


Thank you all for checking out my tutorial. Sorry it's taking so blasted long. Sat down to work on it Monday, grabbed my camera, and discovered that the batteries were dead. Bit of a project stopper, that. Anyways, I'm back on track. Mostly satisfied with the pics I got, and working on putting it all together. Again, apologies for the delay, it'll be together soon.




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Old June 8th, 2010, 11:51 PM
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Re: (INCOMPLETE) Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial

Quote:
Originally Posted by Izner;1105237
[quote=hidicul;1103991
Sounds like someone may have cut themselves with thier SHARP razor/xacto knife...

By the way about how many tiles are you getting out of those small packs?

I've done craft work and used cutting tools for most of my life, and learned proper etiquette... but accidents still happen. A slice here, a finger there... the casualties of art and hobby! But if I can keep others from hurting themselves that'd be super keen.

Also, I updated the tutorial to answer your question. Thank you for the question!

[/quote]

Tell me about those accidents. I've been useing sharp "toys" for better then 10 years, then one night while I was debaseing a heroclix figure my knife slipped and I cut my finger. I couldn't belive it, that one slip destroyed a 10+ years record of not cutting myself

Also to the left of the picture I'm sure are wound markers but what are those on the bottom right? Also as far as this project takeing to long, I have waited since I saw molded hexs 1-2 months ago for something like this, I think I can wait till your done...as long as you finish it
Edit: OK after looking at the hex mold and the pieces in question I think those are what becomes of the resin that is pushed out. If I'm wrong then I still want to know what those are


Last edited by Hidicul : June 9th, 2010 at 12:37 AM.

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Old June 9th, 2010, 12:52 AM
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Re: (INCOMPLETE) Heroscape Tile RESIN CASTING Tutorial

Quote:
Originally Posted by hidicul View Post
Also to the left of the picture I'm sure are wound markers but what are those on the bottom right?
Edit: OK after looking at the hex mold and the pieces in question I think those are what becomes of the resin that is pushed out. If I'm wrong then I still want to know what those are
You are correct! It's scrap.
But I figured it was worth showing since it was part of the total jar volume. There was more scrap, including this giant blob, from the first time I gave this a go, but I'm not sure where I put it all.

Mixed in with those tiles and wound markers are also a few glyphs I cast, a couple of figure bases I made castings out of, and a couple castings from a rock I made a mold out of. Basically, I was measuring out what I needed for my tiles, and then taking whatever was left over and pouring it in other little molds I had made up. A wound token here, a glyph there, and it all adds up. The rock is a custom figure in progress. I'll post it once I get around to finishing the stat card.




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